Presentations

Staying Ahead of the Curve

Last Thursday I gave a keynote at GOTO Berlin to address the problems of deciding how to learn a new technology/framework/process (Spoiler Alert: it’s not by putting it into production).

What do you mean, Backwards Compatibility? (YOW 2013)

YOW recorded me, yet again, talking about the adventure that is the design of the new Java Driver for MongoDB. This is the same talk I gave at GeeCON and DevoxxUK, with some updates based on our Journey So Far. In it, I cover the architecture of the new driver and some of our current thoughts around where we want the API to go.

Career Advice for Programmers (YOW 2013)

Since I have a tendancy to bang on every now and again about how we, as developers, could do better in managing our careers (for example, by creating CVs that don’t suck, and by staying ahead of the curve), Dave Thomas asked me to speak for a mere 50 minutes on the subject at GOTO Aarhus, a talk I wasn’t enormously happy with as there was no way to cover a lifetime of hard-fought experience in such a short time.

Upcoming Events 2014

It’s been a while since I updated you on my travel plans, so now I’ve had some more conferences confirmed, I thought I would pass the information on.

Sparking innovation in an established company

I’ve been running into BSkyB a bunch this week - firstly I was invited to kick off their innovation tech talks series last Monday, then I kept meeting Sky people (that makes it sound like they’re aliens) at QCon. It seems Sky is keen to create/foster a culture of innovation, which is an ambitious goal for such a large company.  So I was given a very vague brief for Monday’s presentation (“Can you do something Mongo-ish, maybe a bit of performance and concurrency stuff, and talk about overall best practice?”) I gave them an early view of a presentation I’m working on titled something like “Why do we keep reinventing the wheel?” (anyone who saw me at JFokus might realise that I cunningly swapped out most of the body of the “What do you mean, backwards compatibility?” talk and tried out this topic instead).

YOW

December disappeared in a rush of vacation and a fleeting tour of Australia.  It’s hard to believe that it’s the eve of Christmas Eve already, it’s almost impossible to feel Christmassy when you’re getting sunburnt on a boat and seeing people in swim-suits wearing santa hats.  A mid-winter festival (complete with trees and fake snow) just feels very odd in summer. I cannot take Christmas seriously in this weatherYOW! is a unique conference, in that it’s the same agenda in three different cities: Melbourne, Brisbane and Sydney.

First presentation at the Virtual JUG!

Yesterday I had the privilege of presenting the very first session for vJUG, a new virtual Java User Group that allows us to span geographies when sharing talks and stories. I’m really interested in the vJUG idea, especially now I’m not in London - if we can find good ways to share knowledge without having to travel, that will help us reach people who don’t normally go to conferences or don’t have a local user group to go to.

JavaOne 2013

So, I thought a few months ago that my blog would become more of a travel blog than a tech blog because of the amount of conferences I was going to.  Turned out that I was so busy writing / updating / practicing talks and workshops and, er, travelling, that I never got around to doing retrospectives on the events I’d been to. So, JavaOne, again, my third year there.  I’ll always have a fondness for it - because of Martin Thompson, it was the first conference I presented at.

Devoxx UK 2013

Last week was the first Devoxx UK, bringing the brand from Belgium and, more recently, France. And I think it was a HUGE success. Of course, disclaimers first - I was on the programme committee, so I might say that the whole thing was awesome. Although in all honesty, even being slightly involved in the organisation of a conference is a lot of work, and you can’t wait to see the back of it (and I didn’t do half as much as some people).

My First Official MongoDB Appearance

Yesterday I had the nerve-wracking dubious alarming great pleasure of presenting my first official MongoDB-shaped talk.  This was in the form of a webinar, which is an interesting and different format. I naïvely assumed it would be like a presentation but without the visible hand-waving, but it isn’t really.  For a start, you can’t easily poll the audience to find out what their level of experience is, and taking questions is quite tricky, even with the technology to support it.

Introduction to the Disruptor Slides

I’ve produced a very cut down version of the presentation I’ve been giving at a lot of conferences, giving a high level overview to the Disruptor.  This serves as a quick intro to the concepts behind it. Introduction to the Disruptor from Trisha Gee My slides are usually pretty useless without me (or someone else) talking over them, so for more context don’t forget there’s always my original blog posts (the Magic Ring Buffer, Reading from it, Writing to it, Wiring it up), which are now pretty dated, and the Java Magazine article I wrote at the start of the year.

The birth of a new community

Topping off my mini-tour at the end of May, I was invited to Rotterdam to present to a brand new community of developers.  I was really interested in attending because my experience with user groups is pretty much limited to the London Java Community, and I knew this would be different due to being a) across a wider range of technologies and b) shiny and new. It was hosted (rather awesomely) in a brewery, and until then I’d never given a presentation in a pub.

Why Open Source Your Secrets

Here’s a video of my Open Conference session on the business benefits of open sourcing your software.  Given that the conference was at a weekend and had a very intimate feel, I think I was a teeny bit more honest than I usually am.  Enjoy. Why Open Source Your Secrets View more presentations from Trisha Gee.

New Disruptor Presentation Unveiled to the LJC!

A few weeks ago, I presented my new “User’s Guide to the Disruptor” talk to the London Java Community.  Since it was very kindly hosted at Skillsmatter, there is a video of the presentation available, and the slides are below. Concurrent Programming Using the Disruptor View more presentations from Trisha Gee The presentation is a little different to the ones we’ve done before.  Previously we’ve gone into how it works and why it’s fast.

JAX London - I learn stuff and meet people

A couple of weeks ago, I was at JAX London along with a number of the London Java Community regulars (Martijn/Ben/John/Sandro/Simon/Zoe I’m looking at you….) My purpose for attending was largely to present the Hardcore Concurrency for Beginners talk that Mike and I debuted at an LJC event a few weeks back. Almost as important was catching up with the aforementioned LJCers and meeting with as many people as would talk to me.

First public appearance caught on video

Remember a while back I talked about my first public appearance? Well, I chased down the video, because I’m masochistic, and here it is for you all to enjoy.  Pleasingly my mannerisms are slightly less of a camp man trapped in a woman’s body, which was my impression the last time I saw myself presenting.  It helps that YouTube has made the video so dark you can’t see me. Slides are available for all to enjoy.

My first public appearance

I’m finally moving up from working behind the scenes to actually doing a (short) presentation for the LJC. I’m going to be giving a lightning talk on Wednesday at the AWS Elastic Beanstalk event, on the JCP - what it is and what our election to the executive committee means.  Ben and Martin’s post gives a little more background on the subject. Another LMAX LJC member Mike will also be giving a lightning talk, on Project Coin.

All Public Appearances

For blatant self-publicity, I’m making a note of all the presentations, panels, interviews, articles and other public-facing events I’ve been involved in.